2018 Crop Diagnostic School

Registration is now open for the 2018 Crop Diagnostic School in Carman, MB.

School dates are July 10-13 and 17-19.

Topics this year will include insect scouting, dicamba drift, pea disease & soil erosion damage mitigation and others.

For more information see Crop Diagnostic School webpage

Registration can be called into 204-745-5663.

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Volatilization of surface applied urea/UAN

Submitted by: John Heard, Manitoba Agriculture, Soil Fertility Specialist
Surface broadcasting of nitrogen (N) fertilizers has become popular to increase operational efficiency – increasing the speed of seeding and reducing risk of seed injury.  But, in a dry spring with limited rain prospects, growers may choose not to till and avoid further drying out seedbeds.  Then growers must consider the risks of nitrogen volatilization loss and take precautions when risk is high.
Volatilization of ammonia (NH3) from urea or the urea portion of UAN (28-0-0) affected by several factors and can be increased under specific situations.
For more details on the risk factors and ways to minimize losses, see full .pdf 
More topics on soil fertility can be found on Manitoba Agriculture’s Soil Fertility webpages.
 
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Spring Preplant Banded nitrogen Too Hot for Corn in Dry Springs!

Submitted by: John Heard, Manitoba Agriculture, Soil Fertility Specialist
There is no single best way to fertilize corn in Manitoba.  The 4 most common N application methods are spring broadcast and incorporated, fall banded, banded at seeding and preplant banded.
In a dry spring like 2018,  broadcasting and incorporating fertilizer before seeding, risk drying out the seedbed.  Many farmers, especially on clay-textured soils prefer not to disturb their seedbed in the spring and so prefer to fall band their N.  And although spring preplant banding is a very efficient way to place nutrients for a corn crop, it comes with some particular cautions – thinning and seedling injury.  
More detailed information and analysis in full .pdf
More topics on soil fertility can be found on Manitoba Agriculture’s Soil Fertility webpages.
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Can Sidebanded Nitrogen Cause Injury in a Dry Year?

Submitted by: John Heard, Manitoba Agriculture, Soil Fertility Specialist

With a lack of seedbed moisture, there are justified concerns about seedplaced fertilizer injury to canola and other crops.  How safe is sidebanded nitrogen? Research studies by  Dr. Cindy Grant documented considerable canola stand thinning when high rates of sidebanded urea or UAN solution were applied.  Agrotain (AT) served to reduce stand injury, but is no longer supported for this use by the manufacturer. 

Points:
  • Stands were thinned at even modest N rates, on a clay loam soil.  At high rates stands were reduced to 50%
  • Crop growth compensated for reduced stands and generally produced as good a yield as the Agrotain protected stands, except at the highest rate.
For more detailed analysis and discussion on the issue see the full .pdf
More topics on soil fertility can be found on Manitoba Agriculture’s Soil Fertility webpages.
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Seed Placed Fertilizer Cautions for Canola

Submitted by: John Heard, Manitoba Agriculture, Soil Fertility Specialist

Spring 2018 has brought many questions about seedplaced fertilizer rates for canola.  Several factors are causing concern:

  • Drier soils – which increase the risk of seed toxicity
  • Desire to apply sufficient P to meet crop removal – since many fields have seen decreasing P levels due to high yield.  P removal is about 1 lb P2O5/bu, so high yield potential fields are looking at high P replacement rates.
  • Increased use in low disturbance, low seedbed utilization (SBU) drills.  Many new openers are arriving on the scene, which are “close-to-seed” sidebanding for which one may need to consider as seedplaced.
  • Desire by growers to reduce seeding rates for cost savings.  Most research studies investigating seedplaced fertilizer injury were seeded at some 150 seed/m2, about double what some farmers are now targeting.
For more detailed analysis on the issue, see the full text in .pdf format 
 
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