How Longer Can Winter Wheat Survive under Flooded Conditions?

Flooding tolerance of crops is impacted by a lot of things, but the main ones are: crop type, length of time under water and the temperature.

A couple of things that winter wheat has going for it is that is may not have yet broke dormancy when the water arrived and with relatively cool soil temperatures and cold water, things slow down for biological activities.  One report from North Dakota indicates that winter wheat could withstand flooded conditions for up to 3 weeks, but source is anecdotal https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/news/newsreleases/2009/april-20-2009/flooding-impacts-winter-wheat/

With all water-logged crops, once water has receded, inspect the crown to see if there are any signs of life. As weather warms and if soils remain saturated, there is still risk of oxygen deprivation in the plants and potential for seedling death.

 

General information on crop tolerance to flooding: https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/crop-management/seed-survival-flood-conditions.html

Impact of Flooding on Soil Fertility in Red River Valley: https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/crop-management/impact-of-flooding-soil-fertility.html

Forage Stands – Assessing Flooding Injury: https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/crop-management/forage-stands-assessing-flooding-injury.html

 

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How Much Nitrogen Do I Use to Fertilize my Fall Hybrid Rye?

Submitted by John Heard, Crop Nutrition Specialist, Manitoba Agriculture

Interest and acreage of fall rye has grown substantially in Manitoba. Hybrid rye has about a 20% yield advantage over traditional open pollinated (OP) varieties and are expanding onto more productive soils than rye’s historic range on the droughty sands.

With increased yield potential comes the question about nitrogen rates to sustain that higher yield. The hybrids are shorter and more lodging tolerant, so one might suspect they can tolerate more nitrogen, and hence respond to more nitrogen. Very few studies have looked at nitrogen rates of the open pollinated versus hybrid varieties. Three Saskatchewan studies provide the extent of the data. From this data we observe the substantial yield increase of the hybrids over the open pollinated variety but that similar rates of nitrogen are required to optimize yield of each.

Read the whole story here (PDF 325KB): hybrid-rye-fertilization-rates

 

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Impact of In-Season Sprayer Track Ruts on Corn Yield

Submitted by John Heard, Crop Nutrition Specialist

The concern that producers have is that compaction in the ruts would limit root growth and subsequently reduce nutrient and water uptake, therefore limiting yield.

University of Minnesota studies indicate a possible 17% yield loss when corn is planted into parts of fields badly rutted during the previous harvest. But yield loss data due to in-season wheel traffic ruts and compaction between rows is limited.

Most of Manitoba Agriculture’s applied corn nitrogen research is done in farmer’s fields, so sprayer traffic through plots does occur. Manitoba Agriculture Soil Fertility Specialist, John Head, is seldom concerned as compaction ruts are rarely visible. However in 2016, on one of the sandy loam sites, sprayer ruts were 3-4” deep and quite visible, so they were taken to yield.

Read the whole story here (PDF 600KB) wheel-ruts-corn-yields 

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