It’s Probably Not Giant Hogweed – 2018

Because of our experience with crops and weeds, it’s no surprise that the general public often turns to agronomists for plant identification and management advice. And it’s usually about this time of year – when Ontario puts out giant hogweed advisories and big white umbels are in bloom across Manitoba – that these calls start to pour in.

Cow Parsnip

Fortunately, it’s probably not giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum) since that invasive species has yet to be found in our province.  It’s more likely another member of the carrot family – cow parsnip (Heracleum maximum).  Unlike its giant cousin, cow parsnip is native to Manitoba and non-invasive.  It’s also very attractive to pollinators.

But even though it’s probably not giant hogweed, it’s still best not to touch it. Because, much like its giant cousin, the sap of cow parsnip may cause dermatitis when in contact with exposed skin.  Symptoms include photosensitivity, a rash and/or blisters.  Reactions to cow parsnip sap are generally much less severe than those to giant hogweed sap.

For more information, see poster on Poisonous Plants in the Carrot Family on Manitoba Agriculture Weeds landing page

 

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Is it Time to Make Wheat Protein?

Wheat growers are nearing decision time on whether to supplement their wheat crop with nitrogen for protein enhancement.

Currently it is suggested that if the yield potential of the wheat crop looks good, and higher than for the N rate initially supplied (i.e. at 2 lb N soil and fertilizer per bu), consider trying a treatment. And check with your marketing consultant whether market signals suggest a shortage of high protein wheat being harvested elsewhere.

Full report and details on treatment and results from University of Manitoba study found on the Manitoba Wheat Barley Growers Association website: Time to Make Protein – The Wheat Grower’s Decision

 

 

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