Blackleg in Canola – to spray or not to spray?

Things to consider:

  1. Crop rotation – the tighter the rotation the higher the risk of blackleg
  2. Historic levels of blackleg in that field – have you experienced yield loss from blackleg?
  3. Weather forecast – infection requires free moisture (light-moderate rainfall, not soil saturation)
  4. Presence of inoculum –can you see leaf lesions on first true leaves? or pseudothecia present on canola stubble?
  5. Yield potential – what is your target yield, return on investment expected?

If you have made the decision to spray, what else do you need to know?

  1. Application timing – apply at the 2 to 4 leaf stage, later applications are not as effective at reducing disease.
  2. Fungicide type – strobilurin fungicides (Group 11) are more effective at reducing disease than triazoles (Group 3). For more information on what products are registered for blackleg management, see the MB Guide to Field Crop Protection http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/guides-and-publications/pubs/crop-protection-guide-disease.pdf.
  3. Yield increase….not guaranteed – while strobilurin fungicides applied at the 2 to 4 leaf stage did significantly reduce the severity of the disease, yield bumps were only observed when a susceptible cultivar was grown.

 

 

 

Reference: Liu, C. 2014. Evaluation of fungicides for management of blackleg disease on canola and QoI-fungicide resistance in Leptosphaeria maculans in Western Canada. Master of Science Thesis. University of Manitoba. 172 pp.

 

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Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Issue 10: July 20, 2016

The Manitoba Insect and Disease Update is now posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-report-2016-07-20.html

Some highlights from the update:

Insects:

  • Pea aphid levels are still a concern in some pea fields, although many fields will be getting to the stage where management would no longer be economical.
  • Aphid levels have dropped in many cereal fields where previously levels had been increasing. High levels of natural enemies have been noted in some of these fields, and some intense rains may have also contributed.
  • In some areas of Central and Southwest Manitoba, greater than 90% of the wheat midge are expected to have emerged. In many areas of Manitoba about 50 to 90% of wheat midge are expected to have emerged. A reminder that wheat that has already produced anthers is no longer susceptible to feeding by wheat midge. Even if adults are still active in these more advanced fields, the larvae will not feed on the grain.
  • Egg masses of European corn corer are starting to be noted in some fields of corn. So far there are no reports of high levels, but now is the time to be checking fields for the egg masses.
european-corn-borer-egg-masses

Figure 1. Egg masses of European corn borer.

Plant Pathogens:

  • Some infections of blackleg in canola and fusarium head blight in cereals have been reported.
  • A few cases of loose smut in barley were also reported.
  • Two positive identifications of Goss’s Wilt in corn were made. The positive identifications were made based on immunostrips and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Pratisara Bajracharya, Field Crop Pathologist, Manitoba Agriculture

Manitoba Agriculture website: www.manitoba.ca/agriculture
Manitoba Agriculture on Twitter: @MBGovAg
Manitoba Agriculture on YouTube: www.youtube.com/ManitobaAgriculture

 

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HOW DO I CONTROL VOLUNTEER CANOLA IN MY SOYBEAN?

First ask yourself if you need to control the volunteer canola in your crop.  Research by Dr. Rob Gulden and graduate student Paul Gregoire at the University of Manitoba (U of M) showed that volunteer canola had little impact on soybean yield when there are less than:

  • 3 plants/m2 in solid seeded or narrow row soybean, or
  • 1.5 plants/m2 in wide row soybean.

Although economic thresholds (ET) such as these don’t consider seed return, this is generally not a concern for canola given it’s prevalence in our crop rotations.

If your volunteer canola populations exceed the ET, the U of M researchers also assessed the effectiveness of various post-emergent herbicides (Table 1).  Control of volunteer canola by the herbicides listed in table 1 are based on comparisons of treated research plots.  It’s unlikely that any of these options will provide full control of bolting or flowering volunteer canola.

Table 1: Ranking and application timing of volunteer canola herbicides in soybean

Vol Canola Control in Soybeans

*Will not control CLEARFIELD canola volunteers

**Registered in the Red River Valley only

Another consideration: use of these herbicides on larger volunteer canola may only set plants back, resulting in later flowering canola that may cause issues during soybean harvest.

Previous research by Dr. Gulden has shown that one of the best ways to manage volunteer canola is by limiting weed seedbank additions from canola harvest losses. Slower combine speeds while harvesting this year’s canola is a good way to reduce volunteer canola populations in future soybean stands.

IMG_20160712_070736

Submitted by Dr. Jeanette Gaultier, Weed Specialist, Manitoba Agriculture

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Spring Frost or Late Snow and Emerged Canola – Time to Re-Seed?

Temperature is the instigator for causing frost, but damage inflicted and need to re-seed canola is highly influenced on these other factors:

  1. Duration
    • Short but LIGHT frost = < 2 hours,  may not cause much damage if frost is light (above -1 to -2°C), crop type and staging is tolerant, conditions wet and crop has become acclimatized.
    • Short and HARD frost = < 2 hours, but hard frost (lower than -2°C), crops like canola are more sensitive to longer frost vs. cereals, damage can be variable in field and across area.
    • Long frost = > 2 hours, whether light or hard the longer the negative temperatures the more time for damage to happen.  Tolerance by crop type varies.
  2. Other Environmental Conditions
    • Cloudy and wet – prior to a frost, cool temperatures slow plant growth and ‘hardens’ plants off, which will help them tolerate a frost.  Also wet soil helps buffer the cold air effects on the plants, as wet soils change temperature slower than dry soils.
    • Sunny and dry – The combination of a  dramatic drop in air temperatures when plants are actively growing then a brilliant sunny day after the frost event is where we have seen the most damage.  Scouting after the frost (24 and 48 hours) is very important though to assess extent and percentage of field injury.
    • Field trash cover – increased trash in fields was seen to increase frost damage on very susceptible crops in the 2009 June and May 30, 2015 frost
  3. Crop Type
    • Spring Cereals – more tolerant than other crops types, can tolerant to temperatures as low as -6°C as growing point below ground until the 5 leaf stage.
    • Winter Wheat – can withstand very low temperatures for a short period of time (-11°C for less than 2 hours) up until the tillering stage.
    • Corn – smaller then V5, will recover from light frost as growing point below ground. Leaves probably will be killed, but plants will recover if the growing point ok.
    • Oilseeds – environmental conditions impact frost severity on susceptible canola and flax cotyledons. Resiliency increases at the 3-4 leaf stage (canola) or 2nd whorl (flax).  Sunflowers are fairly tolerant  up to the V4 stage.
    • Pulses – peas are most tolerant, then soybean, edibles bean are very susceptible even before emergence.   Field pea crops are rarely lost to frost. Soybean are more sensitive, but the smaller the soybean plant the more tolerant they are  – from emergence to cotyledon can withstand short light frosts.

Scouting After a Frost (or Snow event)

Scouting should start 24 – 48 hours after the frost and continue for the 5 days following the frost event.  Look for leaves wilting, looking “water-soaked” or see “frost banding”.  Watch for new growth in the plant.  You do not want to see plants wilted and not perking back up or pinching off on the stem near the growing point (canola, flax, soybeans).  Also assess the area affected by frost, small areas or a few plants damaged are ok, as other plants emerged (or just emerging) will fill in those spaces.  Large dead areas may need to be re-seeded.

If in doubt of what look for, call your local agronomists, local FPE Specialist with Manitoba Agriculture or the Crop Industry Branch.

For more specific details on what actually occurs to plants with a frost and crop specific details and symptoms to look for (and how long after a frost to do assessment) see Manitoba Agriculture’s Spring Frost Damage Bulletin.

NEW RE-SEED Calculator developed by Manitoba Agriculture using historic data from MASC is another tool to help determine if re-seeding is finanacially the right decision, depending on plant stands and time of year see calculator at: https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/business-and-economics/financial-management/pubs/calculator_canolareseed.xls

Submitted by Anastasia Kubinec, Manitoba Agriculture, Oilseeds Crop Specialist

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QU: Should I Be Worried About Stored Canola and Flax Spoiling on a 31C Day in May

Excellent question that we usually do not have to think about in early May!

As most grain is still cold in the bin and with the rapid increase in outside temperature, the potential for spoilage could still occur in stored canola and flax still in the bin from 2015 harvest.

If you think this might be an issues, check what is the seed moisture and the temperature is again. The 5C, 8.5% moisture canola in March had no risk of spoilage, but a 35C, 8.5% moisture canola does.  Flax is susceptible to spoilage as well, if the grain gets very warm in the bin and the moisture is over 8%.   If things are all good today, check in a couple of days again if the May heat wave continues and consider turning on the aeration fan and open up the bin hatch at the top of the bin to let humidity escape.

This question came in as a concern over the potential of condensation to form on the bin walls from the hot outside air hitting the cold grain in the bin.  Aeration could be used as a tool with the hot, but very dry air to warm the grain slowly and move some of the potential humidity out through the top vent or hatch.  Monitoring though is key and should continue until the grain is delivered to catch spoilage issues. A great resource on more about aeration and grain in storage can be found on the PAMI (Prairie Agricultural Machinery Institute) website www.pami.ca/crops/storage and at the Canadian Grains Commission https://www.grainscanada.gc.ca/storage-entrepose/ssg-de-eng.htm

Safe storage chart for canola and flax

Submitted by Anastasia Kubinec, Oilseed Crop Specialist, Manitoba Agriculture

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Historically, what has been seeding progress prior to May 1st?

Some producers have started their 2016 seeding operations, with spring wheat being seeded and from what I’ve heard a few acres of corn as well.  With some seeding done, I’ve been asked the question: “What has been seeding progress prior to May 1st in Manitoba in recent years?”.

Producers who participate in AgriInsurance provides seeding date information to Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC).  This dataset provides us a historical perspective of when seeding has taken place in the past.

In Table 1, cumulative seeding progress prior to May 1st for six crop types is provided.  A five year (2010-2014) average cumulative seeding progress is noted, along with what was seeded prior to May 1st in 2015. Please note that data is for final insured crop in the ground.

Table 1:  Seeding progress in Manitoba prior to May 1st.

Historical Planting Progress prior to May 1st

Data Source:  Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC)

What the table doesn’t show is the wide range of seeding progress prior to May 1st over the past few years.  If we look at seeding progress for red spring wheat in Manitoba, we’ve seen less than 1% of acres seeded prior to May 1st (2009, 2011, 2013 and 2014) but as many as 65% of acres (2010) planted in April.

Look for future updates to historical seeding progress as we enter May!

Submitted by:  Pam de Rocquigny, Provincial Cereal Crops Specialist, Manitoba Agriculture

Follow Manitoba Agriculture on Twitter (@MBGovAg) to receive updates on seeding progress through the weekly Manitoba Crop Report.
The weekly crop report is also available at Manitoba Crop Report.

 

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Can Hot, but Dry Canola Still Spoil in the Bin?

With the extreme temperatures in the past week, harvested canola is coming off hot, hot, HOT!  Reports of canola measuring in the mid to high 30s are common, as well as the canola being dry at 8% and very dry <6%.

Canola in the above situation, even though moisture is low, needs to be conditioned as soon as it is in the bin.  Conditioning the seed, by turning on aeration fans will help move cooler air through the seeds, cooling in down.  If grain if left hot and unattended at temperatures over 15C, there is a greater risk of spoilage.  Using air movement will also help dry out any green weed material in the harvested seed, which will again help reduce spoilage in the canola, from the moisture in the weeds increasing moisture in pockets in your bin.

If you do not have aeration in your bin, leave the bin hatches on the top of the bin propped open, so hot air can escape.  Close the hatches if it starts raining though.  Also consider taking a truck load of canola out of the bin from the bottom and then auger back into the bin through the top hatch.  This can ‘turn’ the grain and the act of augering will introduce cooler air into the canola and help cool it down.

In all situations, monitor the temperature and moisture of the canola in the bins closely.  Canola keeps longer term if it is cooler than 15C and less than 8% moisture.

Canola Watch has more information in their September 2, 2015 post that can be could at http://www.canolawatch.org/2015/09/02/condition-canola-immediately-after-harvest/

Opposite situation – storing damp grain?  Here is some information on steps to take.  The article also has a good explanation on what is going on in the bin with air movement and how spoilage zones can occur: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/production/drying-and-storage-of-damp-grain.html

Submitted by: Anastasia Kubinec, MAFRD Oilseed Specialist

 

 

 

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Clubroot Distribution Map (2009-2014)

http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/plant-diseases/clubroot-distribution-in-manitoba.html

ClubrootRevisedFinal

Map shows positive clubroot findings by Rural Municipality, discovered through laboratory testing for presence of clubroot spores in soil and/or positive confirmation of clubroot symptomatic plants.  Testing was done from 2009-2014 and is still considered limited.  Positive findings have been at low spore concentrations and sporadic throughout the province. As more fields are sampled, the map will be updated.

As less than 5% of farms in Manitoba have been tested, it is recommended that all fields be tested to determine if clubroot spores are present, regardless of RM classification. To date, clubroot has been confirmed in 48 Manitoba fields.
 
Clubroot is a soil-borne pest that can move from field to field on both agricultural and non-agricultural equipment. Specific biosecurity activities to minimize the spread of clubroot will differ by the known levels of clubroot DNA found within the field.  MAFRD has a series of suggestions for all industries operating on agricultural land to minimize the potential of spread on the Crop Biosecurity page.
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Historical Seeding in Progress in Manitoba – First Week of May

Producers who participate in AgriInsurance provides seeding date information to Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC).  This dataset provides us a historical perspective of when seeding has taken place in the past.  Seeding date data information is broken down into a week:month format, i.e. 1:05 is Week 1 in the 5th Month (May).  So 2:05 is Week 2 in May, and so on.

Each week is then categorized dependent on the day of the week in which the month starts.  So if Week 1 starts on a Sunday, there will be 7 days of seeding captured in Week 1.  However, if Week 1 starts on Friday (like we have in 2015), there are 9 days captured in Week 1.  Confused yet?  Essentially, each year will have a different number of days captured in each weekly timeframe, varying from 5 days up to 12 days.  However, the data still provides good reference points to seeding progress in Manitoba.

In Table 1, cumulative seeding progress to the end of Week 1 in May for six crop types is provided.  The last five year (2009-2013) average cumulative seeding progress is noted, along with what was seeded in the same timeframe in 2014.   Please note that data is for final insured crop in the ground.

Table 1:  Seeding progress (%) in Manitoba by end of Week 1 in May (1:05).

End of Week 1 May Seeding Progress

Based on the May 11th Manitoba Crop Report, overall seeding progress is estimated at 55% complete.  There isn’t a provincial breakdown provided of seeding progress by crop type, but in looking at each region, seeding of spring cereals is ahead of the 5-year average of 2009-2013, and well ahead of 2014!

Submitted by: Pam de Rocquigny, Provincial Cereal Crops Specialist, MAFRD 

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Effect of Spring Frost on Emerging Crops

Submitted by Anastasia Kubinec, Manitoba Agriculture, Oilseeds Crop Specialist

Originally posted May 8th and 30th, 2015…..re-post May 13, 2016.

Don’t assume because there is frost (or snow) on the ground, that your emerging crop in dead!

With the drop in temperatures in the past couple of days, there are a few things to keep in mind if the mercury dips below 0°C. The temperature is the instigator for causing frost, but whether it is -0.1°C or -4°C the damage inflicted is highly influenced on these other factors:

  1. Duration
    • Short frost = < 2 hours,  may not cause much damage if frost is light (above -1 to -2°C), crop type and staging is tolerant, conditions wet and crop has become acclimatized.
    • Short frost = < 2 hours, but hard frost (lower than -2°C), crops like canola are more sensitive to longer frost vs. cereals, damage can be variable in field and across area.
    • Long frost = > 2 hours, whether frost is light or hard the longer the negative temperatures the more time for damage to happen.  Tolerance by crop type varies.
  2. Other Environmental Conditions
    • Cloudy and wet – prior to a frost, cool temperatures slow plant growth and ‘hardens’ plants off, which will help them tolerate a frost.  Also wet soil helps buffer the cold air effects on the plants, as wet soils change temperature slower than dry soils.
    • Sunny and dry – The combination of a  dramatic drop in air temperatures when plants are actively growing then a brilliant sunny day after the frost event is where we have seen the most damage.  Scouting after the frost (24 and 48 hours) is very important though to assess extent and percentage of field injury.
    • Field trash cover – increased trash in fields was seen to increase frost damage on very susceptible crops in the 2009 June frost
  3. Crop Type
    • Spring Cereals – more tolerant than other crops types, can tolerant to temperatures as low as -6°C as growing point below ground until the 5 leaf stage.
    • Winter Wheat – can withstand very low temperatures for a short period of time (-11°C for less than 2 hours) up until the tillering stage.
    • Corn – smaller then V5, will recover from light frost as growing point below ground. Leaves probably will be killed, but plants will recover if the growing point ok.
    • Oilseeds – environmental conditions impact frost severity on susceptible canola and flax cotyledons. Resiliency increases at the 3-4 leaf stage (canola) or 2nd whorl (flax).  Sunflowers are fairly tolerant  up to the V4 stage.
    • Pulses – peas are most tolerant, then soybean, edibles bean are very susceptible even before emergence.   Field pea crops are rarely lost to frost. Soybean are more sensitive, but the smaller the soybean plant the more tolerant they are  – from emergence to cotyledon can withstand short light frosts.

Scouting After a Frost

Scouting should start 24 – 48 hours after the frost and continue for the 5 days following the frost event.  Look for leaves wilting, looking “water-soaked” or see “frost banding”.  Watch for new growth in the plant.  You do not want to see plants wilted and not perking back up or pinching off on the stem near the growing point (canola, flax, soybeans).  Also assess the area affected by frost, small areas or a few plants damaged are ok, as other plants emerged (or just emerging) will fill in those spaces.  Large dead areas may need to be re-seeded.

If in doubt of what look for, call your local agronomists, local FPE Specialist with Manitoba Agriculture or the Crop Industry Branch.

For more specific details on what actually occurs to plants with a frost and crop specific details and symptoms to look for (and how long after a frost to do assessment) see Manitoba Agriculture’s Spring Frost Damage Bulletin.

 

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