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Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Week of July 21st to 25th

A Manitoba Insect and Disease Update for the week of July 21-25, 2014 has been posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-update-2014-07-25.html

Highlights include:

Pathology:
  • Goss’s wilt and leaf blight disease are showing up in corn.

Corn leaf with well developed leaf blight of Goss’s Wilt disease. Photo: Vikram Bisht, MAFRD

  • Ergot disease infection is now showing up in fall rye and grasses.
  • Blackleg infection on lower stems/roots on canola is showing up.
  • Downy mildew on sunflowers is reported.
Entomology:
  • Grasshoppers are starting to mature to the adult stage. How much they move into crops from surrounding vegetation may partially depend on how lush the roadside vegetation remains relative to the crop.
  • Still no soybean aphids found in Manitoba in 2014.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Vikram Bisht, Pathologist, MAFRD

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Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Week of July 7th to 11th

A Manitoba Insect and Disease Update for the week of July 7-11, 2014 has been posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-report-2014-07-09.html

A few quick highlights from the update:

  • Leaf rust spots have been observed in fall rye as well as a few spots resembling Septoria leaf spot.
2014-07-09-leafrustryecloseup

Leaf rust spots on fall rye, 2014. Photo courtesy: Vikram Bisht, MAFRD

  • Blackleg spots can be found on canola foliage.
  • Remember to collect samples or notify someone from MAFRD if you are noticing cereal leaf beetle in cereal crops. Levels are quite low in Manitoba, however we are doing a  release of a parasitoid that is very effective at keeping cereal leaf beetle at low levels. The samples of larvae will be sent to AAFC in Lethbridge, where they will be examined for parasitoids. Areas of Manitoba where larvae are present but not already containing parasitoids will be given priority for parasitoid releases.
2014-07-10-cerealleafbeetlelarvae

Larvae of cereal leaf beetle.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Vikram Bisht, Pathologist, MAFRD

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Is it okay to seed fall rye back into rye stubble?

Is it okay to seed fall rye back into rye stubble? I know the deadline to seed is Sept 15. Are there any pro/cons to seeding, say Aug. 15? How does rye do in loam soil? I’m thinking of doing a test plot on some land where I’ve never grown it before.

It is not recommended to follow fall rye with either fall rye or winter wheat because of problems with volunteer rye. Also, if ergot has been an issue, you should follow with a non-susceptible crop for at least a year. Fall rye is best seeded into stubble from a previous non-cereal crop that will allow trapping of snow to reduce winterkill risk.

Seeding fall rye too early usually results in reduced yield and lower 1,000-kernel weight. On the other hand, seeding too late can result in reduced yields, delayed heading, later maturity and lower bushel weight. Fall rye should normally have two to four leaves and up to one tiller before freeze-up, which generally means optimum seeding is in late August-early September. Insurance seeding deadlines for fall rye are Aug. 15 to Sept. 20 (full coverage), with an extended seeding period to Sept. 25 (20 per cent reduced coverage). For more information, contact your MASC agent.

Fall rye is adapted to a wide range of soil types and conditions. It’s a good choice for light, sandy, erosion-prone land, but will respond to better soil types and fertility.

The CropChatter Team

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