Hail Damage – What is the Yield Loss in Cereals & Corn?

Submitted by Anne Kirk, Cereal Crop Specialist, Manitoba Agriculture

Hail has been reported in several areas of Manitoba, and due to the size of the hail and duration of the storm, crops were affected in some areas.  Assessments of damage will occur over the next few days.  The amount of loss expected from a hail event depends on the severity of hail, crop type, and the growth stage of the crop.

Spring Wheat – is least susceptible to hail damage prior to stem elongation since the growing point is below the soil surface and will likely not be damaged.  Hail damage during jointing or in the boot stage is difficult to assess.  Spikes can still pollinate and fill, and regrowth from new tillers can occur.  The more advanced the wheat is at the time of hail the greater the yield loss.  The greatest yield reduction from hail occurs in the milk stage.

Oats and Barley –  will tiller and recover better from hail than wheat, especially prior to the boot stage.  Grower experience has demonstrated that barley hailed severely in the boot stage has recovered to produce 70-80% of normal yield.  Crop hailed prior to the boot stage should be left if stems or green tissue remains.

Corn – early season hail occurring when the growing point is still below the soil surface will result in very little yield loss.  At the 6 leaf stage the growing point is above ground, but leaf loss without damage to the growing point has a small impact on yield.  Yield loss as a result of hail can be estimated by determining percent leaf defoliation (Table 2).   Leaf area removed and leaf necrosis need to be considered, while damaged green leaf tissue should not be included.  Assess leaves 7-10 days after a hail event, so that living and dead tissue can be easily distinguished.

Assessing Damage – New growth should be evident within a few days after a hail event.  Assess crop to evaluate new crop growth.    Yield potential of a damaged crop will depend on rainfall and temperatures in the next 30 days after hail damage.

 

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The Canadian Crop Hail Report – Release Date of August 11th

The Canadian Crop Hail Association represents the companies that sell crop hail insurance to producers in Western Canada. The Hail Report is released every second Thursday during the hail season to provide information on storms, claims and related issues. The report is compiled by McArton & Associates Communications at Dilke, Saskatchewan.

The following is the report for Manitoba from the August 11th Report:

Hail claims in Manitoba remain above the five-year average. A July 20 storm that moved in from the US through Darlingford and Thornhill saw some areas reporting hail that lasted for periods as long as 45 minutes, resulting in severe crop damage. That storm continued north-west towards Manitou and Pilot Mound, lessening in severity as it continued on to the Holland and Treherne areas. On that same day, a storm travelling east from Saskatchewan caused significant damage in areas around Hamiota and Minnedosa. Hail activity in the province has slowed dramatically since those events.

Storm dates and locations of significance for this period included:

  • July 19: Cardale, Darlingford, Hamiota, Holland, Minnedosa, Morden, Neepawa, Notre Dame De Lourdes, Rapid City, Solsgirth, Somerset, Strathclair, Swan Lake, Treherne
  • July 20: Brandon, Dunrea, Elgin, Haywood, Holland, Justice, Killarney, Melita, Minnedosa, Neepawa, Reston, Rossendale, Sinclair, Somerset, St. Claude, Waskada, Winkler
  • July 30: Minto
  • August 1: Hamiota
  • August 3: Souris

Full report is available at The Hail Report_August 11.16

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The Canadian Crop Hail Association’s Hail Report: July 21, 2016

The Canadian Crop Hail Association represents the companies that sell crop hail insurance to producers in Western Canada. The Hail Report is released every second Thursday during the hail season to provide information on storms, claims and related issues. The report is compiled by McArton & Associates Communications at Dilke, Saskatchewan.

The following is the report for Manitoba:

To date, the ratio of claims to policies in Manitoba is significantly higher than average. Two significant storms covered large areas of the province this month. A July 4th storm impacted a large area in the south-central and east side of the province. A July 10th storm hit areas around Bagot and on that same day, a large area along the south-west side of the province was impacted by a storm coming out of Saskatchewan. A storm on July 16th hit southwest of Carman in the Miami area and resulting damage is still to be determined.

Storm dates and locations of significance for this period (including early July damage too late for the July 7 Report) include:

  • July 4: Winkler, LaRiviere, Crystal City, Manitou, Somerset
  • July 5: Brunkild, Cardale, Domain, Fannystelle, Manitou, Hamiota, Morden, Neepawa, Niverville, St. Lazare, Strathclair
  • July 9: Baldur, Boissevain, Cartwright, Clearwater, Deleau, Dunrea, Elgin, Fairfax, Killarney, Minto, Morden, Ninette, Pilot Mound, Somerset, Souris
  • July 10: Bagot, Boissevain, Souris, Virden
  • July 16: Miami

Full report is available at  The Hail Report_July 21.16

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The Hail Report – The Canadian Crop Hail Association; July 7, 2016

The Canadian Crop Hail Association represents the companies that sell crop hail insurance to producers in Western Canada. The Hail Report is released every second Thursday during the hail season to provide information on storms, claims and related issues. The report is compiled by McArton & Associates Communications at Dilke, Saskatchewan.

The complete July 7th report can be read at The Hail Report; July 7, 2016

The following is the report for Manitoba:

Weather conditions have been much warmer and drier in many regions than they were last year and crops are well advanced in those areas. Many acres impacted by last year’s excess moisture are recovering, but continuing wet field conditions are still noted across many regions, especially those with higher rainfall this growing season. These conditions have hindered spraying operations, in some cases. On average, crops are advancing well ahead of average across the whole province. Hail started early and has been scattered throughout the province.

Storm dates and locations of significance for this period include:

  • June 1: Clearwater area
  • June 16/17: Winkler, Altona, St. Pierre, Carman, Roland, Pilot Mound
  • June 25: Benito, Bowsman, Brandon, Bruxelles, Carman, Fannystelle, Elgin, Elm Creek, Kenville, Miami, Minitonas, Notre Dame Delourdes, Pilot Mound, Somerset, St. Leon, Swan Lake, Swan River, Treherne
  • June 29: Bruxelles, Deloraine, Glenboro, Holland, Nesbitt, Notre Dame Delourdes, Pilot Mound, Somerset, Swan Lake, Treherne, Wadcada, Winkler
  • July 4: Carman, Darlingford, Deloraine, Headingley, Holland, La Riviere, Manitou, Morden, St. Francois Xavier, Somerset, St. Leon, Winkler

 

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Hail Damage in Young Corn

Originally Published June 23, 2014

Over the last few days, hail has been reported in several areas of Manitoba.  Generally, young corn has the ability to recover from early season hail damage.  In corn, the growing point remains below the soil surface until the V5 to V6 stage. Therefore, the growing point should be protected and the young corn plants can recover even with significant damage to leaves.  However, it is still important to examine the growing point to see if hail has by chance damage the growing point or the stalk below the soil surface.  To examine the growing point, cut the stalk vertically. A healthy growing point is creamy white in color. If the growing point is watery with a brownish color, the plant is likely dying.  Remember that producers and agronomists are encouraged to wait a few days to allow the crop to improve before doing any decision-making assessments.

Another consideration in corn is plants that are damaged by hail are susceptible to Goss’s Wilt infection as the bacteria can enter through the wounds caused by hail. As you are scouting for Goss’s Wilt throughout the season, focus your attention on fields that are:

  • planted to a Goss’s susceptible hybrid,
  • have a history of Goss’s Wilt,
  • have surface corn residue, and
  • may have been injured by severe weather.

Initial symptoms of Goss’s Wilt include water-soaked lesions on the leaves later accompanied by “freckling”. Bacterial ooze may also occur on the lesion, giving it a wet or greasy appearance. When the ooze dries, it leaves a shiny residue on the surface of the lesion.  More information and photos can be found at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/miu/2012/2012-08-24/report.pdf.

Submitted by:  Pam de Rocquigny, Provincial Cereal Crops Specialist, MAFRD

 

 

 

 

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Hail Stones – August 31, 2013

The photo below shows some of the large hail stones that fell in the Haywood, Manitoba area on August 31, 2013.  Note the loonie in the center of the photo. Strong weather systems passed through several areas of Manitoba over the Labour Day Long Weekend that resulted in damage to crops, as well as vehicles and structures.

Hail Stones – Near Haywood, MB
Photo by: P. de Rocquigny (2013)

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