What areas of Manitoba received the most rainfall in early October 2016?

The following precipitation maps are provided by Manitoba Agriculture’s Ag Weather Program.  The displayed map shows Total Accumulated Precipitation from October 2 to October 4, 2016.

Picture1

 

 

 

 

 

Follow Manitoba Agriculture on Twitter at @MBGovAg to get these seasonal reports and more.

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

It’s That Time of Year – Talking Fall Frosts in Manitoba

UPDATED FROM ARCHIVED CROP CHATTER POST MADE AUGUST 15, 2013

As we enter in the later parts of the growing season, fall frost enters the minds of most people involved in the grain industry.  As everyone knows, frost can have an impact on a crop’s quality and yield.  There were a few areas reporting a light frost event the morning of September 14th.

The extent of frost damage to a crop will depend on several factors. The species, stage, and hardening of the crop, the soil type and soil moisture, the actual air temperature, the duration of freezing, and the rapidity with which freezing takes place are all important. A drop in air temperature of short duration will cause less damage than a prolonged periodthe same low temperature. When the air temperature drops to 0°C, cereal and other crops may not sustain damage. Rather, damage or total loss is more common when minimum temperatures drop below -2°C, often referred to as a killing frost.

Given its sporadic nature, long-range forecasting of frost is nearly impossible. Rather, the climate record of an area is used to determine probable dates of frost based on long-term temperature records. While this will not provide an actual frost date in a particular year, it will present the likelihood that frost may occur on a certain date. This can be a valuable planning tool.

The Manitoba Ag-Weather Program released updated FIRST FALL FROST MAPS in 2014 which are made from the new township gridded normal from a wider dataset of 1950-2010:

For additional information, please visit Manitoba Agriculture’s AgWeather Program at http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/weather/agricultural-climate-of-mb.html.

Submitted by:  Pam de  Rocquigny, Provincial Cereal Crops Specialist, Manitoba Agriculture

Manitoba Agriculture on Twitter: @MBGovAg
Manitoba Agriculture on YouTube: www.youtube.com/ManitobaAgriculture
Manitoba Agriculture website: www.manitoba.ca/agriculture

 

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

Remember the DISEASE TRIANGLE when using MAFRD’s FHB Risk Maps

Previously published June 2, 2014, updated June 24, 2015

MAFRD is providing daily maps on the risk of Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) infection.  The maps are available daily on MAFRD’s website at http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/fusarium-head-blight-report.html. The risk map produced June 24th (see below) shows how the risk for the development of  fusarium head blight has increased over the past few days based on temperature and moisture.

2015-06-24-fhb

The changes over the past week signal to producers to continually scout their fields for local conditions as their crop progresses.  But remember the disease triangle – the existence of a disease requires three factors: the interaction of a susceptible host, a virulent pathogen, and an environment favorable for disease development. Therefore, although the most current risk map shows high risk levels due to environment in some areas of the province, disease is prevented if the winter/spring wheat is not at the proper stage for infection.

Submitted by:  Pam de Rocquigny, Provincial Cereal Crops Specialist, MAFRD

 

Respond
Have a follow-up question?
,

Will the Recent Cold Snap Impact Winter Wheat?

The cold temperatures arrived quickly in Manitoba.  And with those cold temperatures and the minimal snow cover, I received my first “how is the winter wheat doing with the recent cold snap?” question of the 2014/15 winter wheat crop year!

The quick answer is the cold snap likely hasn’t had much of an impact.  In looking at the soil temperatures in the four winter wheat fields we have real-time monitoring in (see the CropChatter post at http://cropchatter.com/real-time-regional-winter-wheat-in-field-soil-temperature-monitoring/), soil temperatures have dipped around the minus 5 degree Celsius mark.  Fortunately, winter wheat is at its hardiness in November and December (see below Figure).  Also, in the late fall (prior to Dec. 20), the soil has a large heat capacity and decreases in soil temperature lag considerably behind decreases in air temperature. Therefore, the probability of the recent cold snap damaging the winter wheat crop is very low.

Picture1Source:  Winter Cereal Production, University of Saskatchewan

We also need to remember that many winter wheat acres were seeded under “optimal” conditions, including before or at recommended seeding dates, into fields with standing stubble, and into good soil moisture helping the crop emerge quickly and uniformly (reaching the recommended stage of 3 leaf to 1 tiller prior to snow fall).  These best management practices lend themselves to a winter wheat crop that is well-hardened.

However, even with those positives, we still need good snow cover starting mid-December to protect the crop from the sustained cold temperatures we typically see in January and February in Manitoba.

Submitted by:  Pam de Rocquigny, Provincial Cereal Crops Specialist, MAFRD

 

 

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

The Dreaded “F” Word – FROST

Given its sporadic nature, long-range forecasting of frost is nearly impossible. Rather, the climate record of an area is used to determine probable dates of frost based on long-term temperature records. While this will not provide an actual frost date in a particular year, it will present the likelihood that frost may occur on a certain date.

The “Date of First Fall Frost” maps at 50%, 25%, and 10% risk show the likelihood that frost will occur on or before the dates shown within the maps. A frost would be expected to occur 1 in 2 years at the 50% risk date, 1 in 4 years at the 25% risk date, and 1 in 10 years at the 10% risk date.

The extent of frost damage to a crop will depend on several factors. The crop type, stage, and hardening of the crop, the soil type and soil moisture, the actual air temperature, the duration of freezing, and the rapidity with which freezing takes place are all important. A drop in air temperature of short duration will cause less damage than a prolonged period at the same low temperature. When the air temperature drops to 0°C, cereal and other crops may not sustain damage. Rather, damage or total loss is more common when minimum temperatures drop below -2°C, often referred to as a killing frost.

For more information on Manitoba’s Agricultural Climate, please visit our website at  http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/weather/agricultural-climate-of-mb.html

Submitted by: Pam de Rocquigny, Provincial Cereal Crops Specialist, Manitoba Agriculture

Information from the article “Risk of Fall Frost” by Andy Nadler, 2010

 

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

Assessing Crops After Heavy Rains

Compiled by the Staff at Crop Industry Branch, Manitoba Agriculture

Some areas of Manitoba received heavy rainfall recently, resulting in the question “What is the extent of crop damage from the heavy rains?”  There is no quick answer unfortunately.  Field by field assessments over the coming days will give a better idea of what impact the rains had on crop development and plant stands. The following link can provide an idea of what is potentially occurring and how to monitor fields to assess for damage and recovery.

What is the Extent of Crop Damage from the Heavy Rains – Updated May 2016

 

Respond
Have a follow-up question?