Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Issue 6: June 22, 2016

The Manitoba Insect and Disease Update is now posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-report-2016-06-22.html

Some highlights from the update:

Insects:

  • Cutworm and flea beetle levels and damage continues to decline.
  • Alfalfa weevil is being noted at high levels in some alfalfa fields
  • Barley thrips are quite noticeable in some barley fields in Eastern Manitoba.
  • Low levels of English gain aphid and oat-birdcherry aphid are being found in some cereal fields.
  • Pea aphid is showing up in some pea crops.

Plant Pathogens:

  • Cereal rust diseases continue to develop and spread.
  • Bacterial blight symptoms in winter wheat and oats were also reported.
  • Root rot pathogens continue to cause problems in soybean fields.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Pratisara Bajracharya, Field Crop Pathologist, Manitoba Agriculture

Manitoba Agriculture website: www.manitoba.ca/agriculture
Manitoba Agriculture on Twitter: @MBGovAg
Manitoba Agriculture on YouTube: www.youtube.com/ManitobaAgriculture

 

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Issue 5: June 15, 2016

The Manitoba Insect and Disease Update is now posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-report-2016-06-15.html

SUMMARY:
Insects: Cutworms continue to be an issue in some areas. Flea beetle feeding continues, although foliar use of insecticides for flea beetle management has not been widespread. In many fields plants are now getting to stages more tolerant to feeding by flea beetles. Alfalfa weevil is being noted at high levels in some alfalfa fields.

Plant Pathogens: Rust diseases in cereal crops and sunflower have been observed in Manitoba. Root rots in soybeans have also been reported from various locations in Manitoba. Scouting and monitoring progression of disease symptoms in the field will help in making fungicide application decisions.

Several samples of soybeans showing root rot symptoms have been submitted to Manitoba Agriculture’s Crop Diagnostic lab. Root rot is soybeans are caused by pathogens like Fusarium spp, Phytophthora sojae, Rhizoctonia spp and Pythium spp

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Pratisara Bajracharya, Field Crop Pathologist, Manitoba Agriculture

Manitoba Agriculture website: www.manitoba.ca/agriculture
Manitoba Agriculture on Twitter: @MBGovAg
Manitoba Agriculture on YouTube: www.youtube.com/ManitobaAgriculture
Respond
Have a follow-up question?
,

Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Issue 4: June 8, 2016

The Manitoba Insect and Disease Update for this week is now posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-report-2016-06-08.html

Summary
Insects: Cutworms are getting larger and have been an issue in some fields. The highest level of damage appears to be in the Northwest, where there has been some reseeding because of cutworm feeding. Flea beetle feeding continues, although foliar use of insecticides for flea beetle management has not been widespread. In many fields plants are now getting to stages more tolerant to feeding by flea beetles.

Plant Pathogens: Stripe rust has been detected in Manitoba. Scout for stripe rust and report any detection. Stripe rust incidences will need to be closely monitored.

Stripe Rust in Winter Wheat Near Gladstone, MB (June 8, 2016)_A.Knaggs

Stripe Rust in Winter Wheat Near Gladstone, MB (June 8, 2016). Photo by A. Knaggs.

To be placed on an E-mail list so you will be notified immediately when new Manitoba Insect and Disease Updates are posted, please contact John Gavloski at 204.745.5668.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Pratisara Bajracharya, Field Crop Pathologist, Manitoba Agriculture

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Issue 3: June 1, 2016

The Manitoba Insect and Disease Update for June 1, 2016 is now posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-report-2016-06-01.html

SUMMARY

Insects: Cutworms and flea beetles on canola continue to be the insects of greatest concern. The cool, damp weather from the last few days would have slowed cutworm feeding, and the soil moisture, where not excessive, may help the plants compensate for feeding. Cutworm levels are quite variable, hard to find in some fields, more noticeable in others. So scout for potential cutworm feeding on emerging plants and dig for the larvae if you find an area that is showing signs of cutworm feeding. Precautionary insecticide applications, if cutworm levels are not economical, is not encouraged because of the potential damage to beneficial invertebrates.

Plant Pathogens: Rain has not only provided enough moisture for crops, but also for pathogens causing various crop diseases. Look for early signs and symptoms of diseases in crops. Scout! Scout! Scout!

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Pratisara Bajracharya, Field Crop Pathologist, Manitoba Agriculture

Visit the Insect Pages of our Manitoba Agriculture website at http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/insects/index.html
Respond
Have a follow-up question?

Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Issue 2: May 25, 2016

The Manitoba Insect and Disease Update for this week is now posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-report-2016-05-25.html

SUMMARY

Insects: Cutworms and flea beetles on canola are the insects of greatest concern currently. Seed treatments should still be effective against flea beetles in most canola fields, although scouting for feeding damage is encouraged, especially in the earlier seeded fields where seed treatments may soon start losing effectiveness. Cutworm levels are quite variable, hard to find in some fields, more noticeable in others. So scout for potential cutworm feeding on emerging plants and dig for the larvae if you find an area that is showing signs of cutworm feeding.

Plant Pathogens: Scouting for stripe rust in wheat and seedling diseases in emerging crops will be important.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Pratisara Bajracharya, Field Crop Pathologist, Manitoba Agriculture

Visit the Insect Pages of our Manitoba Agriculture website at http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/insects/index.html

 

 

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

Archived MAFRD Seasonal Reports

Crop Industry Branch staff, as well as other MAFRD staff, work each year to provides seasonal updates on what is happening in Manitoba fields and news about conditions that could affect your crops.

The various reports below are archived and available for viewing on MAFRD’s website:

The archived information will be of benefit as we try to explain what happened in 2015, how does 2015 compare to other years, and how to apply what we’ve learned to the 2016 crop year!

Submitted by: Pam de Rocquigny, Provincial Cereal Crops Specialist, MAFRD

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

What are these “eggs” on cereal heads in my field?

Quite a few people over the past week have sent in photos (as in Figure 1 below) asking what are these “eggs” on the cereal heads, and noticing that they can be quite abundant in some fields.

Parasitoid Pupal Cases

Figure 1. Pupal cases of a wasp parasitic to armyworms. Photo from Dean McCowan, Agree Ag Services.

These are not eggs, but are the pupal cases of parasitic wasps. These are being found in fields that contained armyworms, and it is likely that armyworms were hosts for the parasitoids. For some parasitoids it is common for dozens of parasitoid larvae to emerge at the same time from an individual armyworm, killing it in the process. This is because an initial egg laid in the armyworm starts dividing and can become dozens or at times hundreds of eggs, that results in multiple parasitoid larvae of the same general age feeding in the armyworm. When the parasitoids emerge form the armyworm, they all emerge at approximately the same time, and very soon after form these clusters of pupal case, which are together in a cluster on the plants. So each cluster would have been parasitoids form a single armyworm, and will result in multiple wasps looking for more caterpillars to parasitize.

Information by:  John Gavloski, Entomologist, MAFRD

This article was taken from the Manitoba Insect & Disease Update: July 14, 2015.  For the complete issue, please visit MAFRD’s website at http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-update-2015-07-14.html

 

 

 

 

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

Manitoba Disease & Insect Update – August 15th

A Manitoba Insect and Disease Update for the week of August 11-15, 2014 has been posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-update-2014-08-15.html

Highlights include:

  • Grasshoppers continue to be a concern in some areas.
  • Lygus bugs should be scouted in canola in the late-flowering and early-podding stages.
  • Soybean aphid has been found in Manitoba, but only at very low levels.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Vikram Bisht, Pathologist, MAFRD

Respond
Have a follow-up question?
,

Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Week of July 7th to 11th

A Manitoba Insect and Disease Update for the week of July 7-11, 2014 has been posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/insect-report-2014-07-09.html

A few quick highlights from the update:

  • Leaf rust spots have been observed in fall rye as well as a few spots resembling Septoria leaf spot.
2014-07-09-leafrustryecloseup

Leaf rust spots on fall rye, 2014. Photo courtesy: Vikram Bisht, MAFRD

  • Blackleg spots can be found on canola foliage.
  • Remember to collect samples or notify someone from MAFRD if you are noticing cereal leaf beetle in cereal crops. Levels are quite low in Manitoba, however we are doing a  release of a parasitoid that is very effective at keeping cereal leaf beetle at low levels. The samples of larvae will be sent to AAFC in Lethbridge, where they will be examined for parasitoids. Areas of Manitoba where larvae are present but not already containing parasitoids will be given priority for parasitoid releases.
2014-07-10-cerealleafbeetlelarvae

Larvae of cereal leaf beetle.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Vikram Bisht, Pathologist, MAFRD

Respond
Have a follow-up question?

Manitoba Insect & Disease Update – Week of June 30 to July 4

A Manitoba Insect and Disease Update for the week of June 30 to July 4, 2014 has been posted at: http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/seasonal-reports/insect-report-archive/2014-07-02-insect-update.html

  • Information is provided on the potential effects of flooded fields on grasshoppers and wireworms.
  • Brown spot and bacterial leaf blight have been occurring in some soybean fields; risk of Fusarium head blight in cereals is high to extremely high.
2014-07-03-brownspotdisease

Brown spot disease on lower leaves of canopy. Photo courtesy: Vikram Bisht, MAFRD

  • Forecasts for emergence of wheat midge and a key parasitoid of wheat midge are provided.

Submitted by: John Gavloski, Entomologist & Vikram Bisht, Pathologist, MAFRD

Respond
Have a follow-up question?