Will storage of infected grain for over 1 year reduce Fusarium spp. infection and DON levels?

The viability of various Fusarium spp. during storage is dependent on the storage conditions, with temperature playing a key role. Scientific studies have demonstrated that Fusarium infection levels will be reduced when infected grain is stored for at least 6-9 months at a constant temperature of 25 °C and where either relative humidity is >62% or seed moisture content is at least 10-14%. One study demonstrated elimination of Fusarium graminearum when corn seed was stored in sealed containers at 30°C and a seed moisture content of 14%. However, the same is not true for infected grain stored at cooler temperatures (less than 15°C) which are more consistent with the recommendations for grain storage on the Canadian Prairies. At temperatures below 15C the viability of the pathogen (Fusarium spp.) is unchanged, unchanged, especially under drier conditions, making long term storage of infected grain a poor strategy for reducing Fusarium infection levels. Also, if the grain is to be used for seed, prolonged storage of infected grain at higher temperatures and moisture levels may result in reduced vigour and germination rates.

The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) in Fusarium infected grain is also unaffected by long-term storage, regardless of the temperature. Under safe storage conditions changes in DON levels would be unlikely.

Submitted by

Holly Derksen, Field Crop Pathologist, Manitoba Agriculture

Barbara Ziesman, Provincial Specialist, Plant Disease, Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture

Michael Harding, Research Scientist, Plant Pathology, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry

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